Common Hockey Equipment Rashes

Rashes

Anyone who has ever been an athlete knows the struggles that come with wearing equipment. In the case of hockey, this is no exception. Just the mere fact of having to put pads on daily can be enough to make one cringe. On top of this many, athletes will experience rashes and irritations because of their hockey equipment.

What Types of equipment rashes are common?

One of the most common types of rashes caused through hockey equipment is known as “Athlete’s Foot”. According to mayoclinic.org: “Athlete’s foot is caused by the same type of fungus that causes ringworm and jock itch. Damp socks and shoes and warm, humid conditions favor the organisms’ growth.” Being in hockey equipment all the time can become a breeding ground for the infamous Athlete’s Foot, especially if you already have it. Commonly, athlete’s foot can be caused by walking around barefoot in places such as locker rooms.

Athlete’s foot

When confined to such padding and physical exercise, your body will begin to heat up and sweat will begin to stick to the pads, shoes, and socks causing the foot and toes to be irritated. But how do you know if you have athlete’s foot? This part is simple. You will begin to notice redness, cracking, and itching on your feet and in between your toes. Too often athletes mistake this for dry feet but this may not always be the case. Sometimes, it may even be more obvious than this if you start to see blisters or ulcers forming. Nevertheless, you are putting yourself at an unnecessary risk. Some people who develop athletes foot will just experience some itching and minor pain. But if left untreated, hockey players and athletes alike can develop bacterial infections and long term athlete’s foot. It can also become more irritating and painful.

So be smart with this. Make sure to take showers after practice and to constantly have your equipment and socks washed. Wearing equipment and socks over and over again is just going to cause you more problems. Also, consider using sandals in the locker room which could decrease your risk. If you do develop athlete’s foot you may want to consider using an antifungal treatment. If your condition worsens then definitely consider seeing your doctor. This Is one equipment rash you do not want to have to deal with.

Other Hockey Equipment Rashes

While Athlete’s Foot is common among athletes and hockey players, ringworm is also extremely common and it is fairly easy to recognize. Ringworm is recognized by an obvious ring of scaly red blisters. When being on an athletic team equipment sharing is a common thing but definitely something to be careful about. The best way to prevent ringworm from happening is simple: DON’T USE OTHER PEOPLES EQUIPMENT. Also, make sure to wash your equipment and clothing as much as possible. Like athlete’s foot, ringworm can cause itching and other problems but also can be treated with antifungal medicine.

Be Smart

I will end this by saying to simply be smart and educate yourself further. Now you know some possible rashes as a result of hockey equipment and clothing. Too many hockey players and athletes alike never really take the proper precautions and it is important that they do.

*References WebMD and Mayoclinic

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